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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Tayloren_US
dc.contributor.editorBlanchard, Tessaen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarter, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorGeary, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.editorRenner, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.editorRiley, Meghanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-15T21:56:30Z
dc.date.available2016-11-15T21:56:30Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11244.46/1235
dc.descriptionRunner-up for the Griswold Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Historical Scholarshipen_US
dc.description.abstractHistory is political. Never has this been truer than in the former Soviet Union, where the past was subject to incessant ‘revisions.’ Mr. Schmidt takes on the Ukrainian famine, or Holodomor, from an international perspective, and does so quite thoroughly. As the paper unfolds, the reader comes to realize how inextricably entwined Ukranian identity is with this event. Genocide perpetrated on Ukranian people, or unintended pan-Soviet tragedy, the Holodomor’s political implications reach across oceans. The paper distinguishes itself with its in depth research and the author’s acute sensitivity to the gravity of the topic he so brilliantly explores. - Ryan Gearyen_US
dc.description.urihttp://history.ou.edu/journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOU historical journal ; 1 (Fall 2012)en_US
dc.titleFamine, Genocide, and Memory: Ukrainians and the Commemoration of the 1932-1933 Holodomoren_US
dc.contributor.sponsorFolsom, Raphaelen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorHolguín, Sandieen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorLevenson, Alanen_US


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