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dc.contributor.authorPittman, Kaylaen_US
dc.contributor.editorBlanchard, Tessaen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarter, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.editorGeary, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.editorRenner, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.editorRiley, Meghanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-15T21:55:44Z
dc.date.available2016-11-15T21:55:44Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11244.46/1228
dc.descriptionRunner-up for the Griswold Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Historical Scholarshipen_US
dc.description.abstractThis distinguished article reminds us that written texts are not the only historical evidence available to us. The author makes creative use of visual and archaeological sources in conjunction with cutting-edge theories of space and place to show us how Monticello's architecture reflected the inner workings of its designer's mind. Thomas Jefferson is among our most important, and hence most thoroughly studied, presidents. This paper performs the remarkable feat of offering new insights on topics we thought were deeply familiar. With the rigor and playfulness of a fine art critic, Kayla Pittman makes the familiar strange. -Raphael Folsomen_US
dc.description.urihttp://history.ou.edu/journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOU historical journal ; 1 (Fall 2012)en_US
dc.titleThe Worlds of Monticello Mountain: How Space Reflected Power and Politics on an Eighteenth Century Chesapeake Plantationen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorFolsom, Raphaelen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorHolguín, Sandieen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorLevenson, Alanen_US


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