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dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Dakota
dc.creatorVaughan, Dakota
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-06T19:53:22Z
dc.date.available2016-09-06T19:53:22Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11244.46/108
dc.description.abstractThe American Civil Rights Movement that in many respects defined the 20th century was itself defined by its leaders. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and Malcolm X are today household names. While these nationally recognized figures are certainly iconic of the Movement, consider, too, as leaders the African-American physicians of the Civil Rights era. We hold our doctors in high regard and to high standards of moral and just behavior, and it is nothing controversial to consider a physician to be a community leader. With the 20th century issues of segregation both in higher education and in the practice of healthcare in mind, what was the role of African-American physicians as leaders in the Civil Rights Movement of the era? It is easy to imagine that black physicians were bound by the Jim Crow laws in the South and--until federal intervention--were unable to receive a medical education or practice their craft in a desegregated context. However, evidence offered in the form of oral accounts given by African-American physicians working in Texas during the 20th century gives a different perspective. It is revealed that these physicians were at the forefront of their own civil rights effort early after the Second World War. The nature of African-American physician involvement in the Civil Rights Movement and the effect that the Movement had on the lives of these individuals are intertwined. Just as the experiences of African-American physicians in the mid-twentieth century were heavily shaped by the social and political contexts of the era, in turn these physicians helped to shape the social realities in which they worked.en_US
dc.format.extent7 pages
dc.format.extent366,401 bytes
dc.format.mediumapplication.pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.requiresAdobe Acrobat Reader
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectDavid W. Levy Prize Finalisten_US
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American physicians -- History -- 20th centuryen_US
dc.subject.lcshAfrican Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th centuryen-US
dc.subject.lcshCivil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryen-US
dc.titleA prescription for desegregationen_US
dc.typeDocument
dc.typetext
ou.course.deptHISTen_US
ou.course.number1493
ou.facultySchumaker, Dr. Kathrynen_US
ou.teacherPearce, Dr. Matten_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States